The Revised National Planning Policy Framework: More of the Same?

The Revised National Planning Policy Framework: More of the Same?

It doesn’t happen very often, but for those involved in the planning world, this week marks the publication of the revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF).

Since 2012, the NPPF has formed the Country’s national policy which is used to guide strategic planning and assess planning applications. The revised document promises big – the draft document was clear that the housing crises could no longer be ignored:

“…a comprehensive approach for planners, developers and councils to build more homes, more quickly and in the places where people want to live.”

Secretary of State Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP

We are however disappointed to see the watering down of the small sites requirement, which was expected to require at least 20% of a Local Planning Authority’s housing requirement to be identified on smaller sites of 0.5 hectare or less. These sites being brought to the front line in strategic plans and site allocations, would be important, like larger sites, in providing for local housing needs. There are many more smaller sites, they can be constructed quickly and usually require less infrastructure.  

What has transpired with the publication of the revised NPPF, is the size has increased to 1 hectare and the requirement for there to be 20%, has dropped to 10%. It looks like the owners of small sites will need to continue to pursue the planning application route to realise the potential of land and buildings. More windfall and gone is the opportunity for smaller parcels of land to be potentially allocated for development, in a way that proposal maps have not previously considered.

We can see the relief on the face of some cash strapped Council’s, and understandably so, but why, if we are serious about tackling the housing crises, are we not properly resourcing local planning authorities?

Six years have passed since the rationalised national policy emerged and as with many things, time will tell as to whether it delivers on its promises. We sense a missed opportunity, although the NPPF has much to offer such as the housing delivery test and its emphasis on design.

Another Enforcement Notice Overturned on Appeal

Farooq and the team have achieved a rare feat in the world of planning – we have helped secure the withdrawal of a Council’s  Enforcement Notice.

This case has proved to be a very painful lesson for the local authority. Rather than listening to objections by vociferous neighbours, it is important that Councils make fair and subjective decisions on planning applications.

Had the Council recognised their mistake and investigated the application in a sensible manner, they would have saved not just themselves, but the property owner and the Planning Inspectorate, a lot of time and money. It could now become even more painful, as future proposals indicate the Council may have to reimburse the Planning Inspectorate’s costs as well.

We’re hoping that this example might just install more discipline to all those involved in the planning process.

If you find yourself in a similar situation and would like some advice on how to submit a planning appeal, then please contact us today.